Titan - three-wheeled portable industrial timber bandsaw - made in USA



Back side of the Titan - three-wheeled portable bandsawsCut depth 18"
Throat width 18"
Blade length 110"
Max. blade width 1/2"
Lever action tensioning
Machined alum. wheels
3/4 HP TEFC 120/240 V
Ball bearing guides
Ball bearing tensioner slides
SFPM 4600
Includes free tripod stand
16" Blade guide extension
Quick change front cover


Watch these video demonstrations of Titan in action:


Cutting Corbels with a Portable Band Saw:
The crew at Davis Hawn Lumber demonstrates fancy rafter tails for a crowd of customers in Dallas.

My 16 year-old son demonstrates maneuverability on an ogee rafter tail.  See advanced carving technique with right angles, radius and detail.  Note how the blade gets an inch in front of the guide without comin off; that's tracking tenacity!

New customer makes his first cut, an arch, flawlessly; gaining speed and confidence by the inch!

 

Titan Details

"The Titan" -  industrial timber bandsaw - three-wheeled portable band sawYou wouldn't know to look at it, but the three-wheeled blade transport system on the Titan weighs about the  same as the motor that drives it. If the motor was installed on the back side of the saw, the lower wheel would constantly try to swivel back into your knees. If the motor was placed any closer to the platen, the blade transport system  (holding the wheels) would constantly try to fall off to the left of whatever you rested the saw on.

Placing the motor out so far away from the platen gives the weight of the motor enough leverage to lift the left half of the saw up to equal the motor side, so everything balances precisely where the blade passes through the center of the platen; where you'll also find an opening of almost 3” providing an excellent view of your saw's exact position on the beam and its relation to your scribe line.

If you haven't started to cut yet and the blade is just laying up against the side of your beam you'll find that the saw can be made to stay right where it is by setting a pencil on the motor's switch box. The balance is that precise. You notice it most when you're pulling the saw through an intricate series of right angle turns using nothing more than the two little T-handles on the front of the platen. You'll have your nose right in there carving precision details within tolerances of less than a sixteenth inch. And then you still won't believe how easy it is. You'll have to do it again and again to prove it really happened that way.

And you'll be ROFLYAO when you hear experienced woodworkers talking about how they put wheels on their floor-standing 14”er to cut an arch. Tell them you'd be happy to cut those arches for them. Nobody is so busy they can't take a little time to do some custom millwork; you could make a decent second income of it. Most customers say the saw paid for itself the first week they used it. Most customers would prefer you didn't know how easy it is to make those cuts.